Skull Painted T-Shirt

Halloween just isn’t as big of a deal at my house as it used to be.  The kids are older – they make plans of their own and leave.  My husband works that night more often than not.  We live out in the toolies, so no trick-or-treaters.  Before you think I’m having myself a little pity-party, I’m ok with it.  I don’t have to magically create costumes at the last minute or try to figure out how much candy the neighborhood can consume, so I’m free to focus on the things I want to make.

I’ve been wanting to try the Freezer Paper Stencils again, and an orange shirt looking up at me sadly from a clearance table gave me the perfect opportunity.

Skull Painted T-Shirt 1

Skull Painted T-Shirt 1

I used the same technique as I did the last time to print and apply the stencil.  It’s outlined here.  I mixed the paint with textile medium and daubed it on with a sponge, intentionally leaving some areas without paint.

Skull Painted T-Shirt 2

Skull Painted T-Shirt 2

When the paint dried, I removed the stencil and outlined all of the edges with a small brush, using glow-in-the-dark paint mixed with textile medium.  When it dried, it was semi-transparent so it looked just a shade lighter than the shirt.

Skull Painted T-Shirt 3

Skull Painted T-Shirt 3

I wish, with all my heart, that I could show you a photo of it glowing in the dark.

Skull Painted T-Shirt 4

Skull Painted T-Shirt 4

I gave it to the girl, but I might borrow it back and use it as my Halloween costume.  I was just informed that she would be needing help making a Batman costume (!) so she won’t be wearing it anyway.

Halloween Candy Shadowbox

This is so cheap and simple, I almost feel guilty posting it.  But, sometimes there's nothing wrong with quick and dirty. I started with a shadowbox frame.  If you're unfamiliar with the shadowbox, it's a frame with an inch or two of depth to it so you can put mementos in it.  I've had this one for a while, but I'm pretty sure I bought it at the dollar store.

I bought a bag of Autumn mix at the grocery store for about $1.50.  I took the back off the frame and laid it glass-side down.  I meant to just dump the candy in and let it fall where it may.  You might notice I couldn't bring myself to do that.  In order to keep the candy from moving  when I put the back on and picked it up, I made sure it was packed in tightly and the frame was completely full.

Halloween Candy Shadowbox
Halloween Candy Shadowbox

I planned to stick a cut-out bat to the front, but with its neat, little rows I thought it stood up well on its own.  I also considered vinyl letters, which I didn't use, but haven't ruled out.

My favorite thing about this project, besides it's $2.50 price tag, is that I don't have to find somewhere to store it after Halloween is over.  With its pumpkin and candy corns, I think I'll let it ride through Thanksgiving, then dump it out and fill it with Christmas candy.  Or tinsel.  Or ornaments.  Nope...candy.

Stitched Thank You Cards

As some of you know, I had surgery, a fairly lengthy hospital stay and recovery time at home (technically, still in effect) recently.  Our friends and family didn't forget about me, sending over candles and lotions and flowers and magazines.  Now that I'm pretty much back on my feet, it's time for the thank you's. I had to make the cards.  Had to.  Ok, chose to.  I wanted them to be special.  I was meandering through the craft store and saw large paper tags for scrapbooking and thought they'd make cute cards.  I've also been wanting to try sewing on cards, so here's what I came up with.

Card 1
Card 1

You can print the card and envelope here on cardstock.  There are three cards per sheet, but only one envelope, so you'll need to print the envelope page alone twice to come out right.  Cut out all pieces along the gray lines. 

Card 2
Card 2

Cut out 18 rectangles of fabric, 1 3/8" by 1 3/4".  Cut 2 pieces 1/2" by 2 1/2".  Iron onto card, using  a small scrap of fusible web (like Wonder Under or Steam-a-Seam) for each rectangle, no steam.  The adhesive doesn't need to be as big as the rectangle, just a little bit to hold it in place.  The two longer pieces go on the card as shown in the photos.

Card 3
Card 3

Trim away the fabric covering the notch on the envelope.  You'll notice on the card in my examples, there's a lot of white space showing on the edges.  I increased the size of the fabric on the other cards to the dimensions above to fix that.

Card 4
Card 4

Zigzag stitch between all the rectangles, backstitching at ends to secure.  Stitch across the top edge of the back envelope piece and across the top edge and notch of the front.  Stitch a row through the middle of the fabric on the card, pulling the ends to the back and knotting.

Card 5
Card 5

Lay front and back of envelope, wrong sides together and stitch down sides and across bottom.  Punch a hole in the top of the card and tie on a piece of ribbon.

Card 6
Card 6

Carefully slide the card into the envelope.  If you're mailing these, they will fit in a regular invitation-size envelope (5 3/4" by 4 3/8") and don't require any extra postage.

Card 7
Card 7

All this bright color, and one of my favorites turned out to be the black and white one.

Card 8
Card 8

Although, I kinda love them all.

Card 9
Card 9
Card 10
Card 10